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Monday, 18th Dec 2017

Sometimes doing your best in the classroom is not enough. No matter how much time you invest in planning your work and in making resources you fail to get through to some of your students. This is a feeling shared by a good number of educators most of whom would like to give an excellent service to their students. Although we know our lesson content well and we select activities which will fully complement the learning objectives, we usually fail to consider our learners and the way they learn. We assume that our learners are able to write, follow directions and create or build their own projects with ease.

What is The Let Me Learn Process?

The Let Me Learn Process is an advanced learning system that that is based on the idea that every learner is unique. This process helps learners understand and express the way in which they prefer to learn. These preferred methods of learning are exhibited in our outward actions, in the way we approach learning tasks, and also in the way we perceive and interpret the world around us.

The strength of the Let Me Learn Process lies in the fact that it helps us become independent learners. This process takes us through a metacognitive journey in which we equip ourselves with learning strategies thus helping us go through the learning process with intention.

Let Me Learn starts with the understanding that all learning is an interactive process of thinking doing and feeling. This interactive process reveals itself in four learning patterns:

  •  Sequence
  • Precision
  • Technical Reasoning
  • Confluence

How did the Let Me Learn Process start?

The Let Me Learn Process, developed by Prof. Christine Johnston of Rowan University in the early 1990’s, has been used to explore ‘learning’ within a number of educational organisations. The process has since spread across the United States and across Europe, including Malta. Malta can be considered as a co-developer of the Let Me Learn Process since we participated in the initial developments of the Learning Connections Resources and its validation. Malta was one of the first countries that started using the inventory to implement learning strategies which fit the learning profile of each child. After the initial contacts in 1996, we had a series of developments and awareness lectures around the country. This led up to the first group of Maltese teachers being trained in the LML process in 1999.

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